Who cares what it is? Liberals support it.

Therefore it must be pernicious. No need to define it or know what it is.

“Critical race theory is an academic framework that explores how racism is embedded in U.S. policies and systems.

“Recently, though, conservative pundits and politicians have attempted to conflate it with a slew of other concepts, such as diversity and inclusion efforts, anti-racism training, social justice activism or multicultural curricula.”

Advocates say the new Texas law, which goes into effect on Sept. 1, will have a chilling effect on schools.

The horns of a dilemna

There’s “a roiling debate in education, about how and even whether to measure the academic impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the nation’s children — and how to describe learning gaps without stigmatizing or discouraging students and families.”

There’s no question but that millions of students have fallen behind. Two solutions. We spend the time to get them back up to where they should be. That could well mean repeating the lost year (or two). That’s stigmatizing and discouraging. Or we don’t. In which case, a generation remains behind. That’s also stigmatizing and discouraging.

Treasonable noticing of seditious facts

Nicholas Kristoff in the NYT: “The newest Social Progress Index, shared with me before its official release Thursday morning, finds that out of 163 countries assessed worldwide, the United States, Brazil and Hungary are the only ones in which people are worse off than when the index began in 2011. And the declines in Brazil and Hungary were smaller than America’s. …

“The United States, despite its immense wealth, military power and cultural influence, ranks 28th — having slipped from 19th in 2011. The index now puts the United States behind significantly poorer countries, including Estonia, Czech Republic, Cyprus and Greece.”