Let’s hope SCOTUS does the right thing

“In the United States, racialized police misconduct is endemic. Law enforcement officers too often cover up their abuses of BIPOC [Black, Indigenous, and Other People Of Color] with false ‘cover charges’ such as resisting arrest. The victims of police cover charges then suffer arrest, jail, court appearances, and all the collateral consequences (legal fees, lost wages and jobs) that come with prosecution. However, because the charges were trumped-up, no meaningful evidence exists, and the case is eventually dismissed.

“This might seem like a win, but in jurisdictions that apply an indications-of-innocence standard, it isn’t. Although the falsely accused person no longer has to defend against criminal charges, they can’t seek justice for having been falsely prosecuted in the first place. This leaves the victim of police cover charges with no meaningful recourse.”

How a little procedural rule before the Supreme Court has big consequences for racialized police misconduct in New England and beyond.

Prophecy is a tricky business

At the end of 2019, I attempted to look ahead to what to expect in the U.S. Supreme Court in 2020. Of course, the most important stories?the COVID-19 pandemic and how it changed the court, the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the confirmation of Justice Amy Coney Barrett?could not possibly have been foreseen.

Science? We don’t need no stinking science!

The Supreme Court ruling against New York state's decision to limit religious gatherings in a few high-incidence parts of New York City during the Covid-19 pandemic will cause grave danger in the rest of the country, where public health authorities will feel hamstrung to restrict religious gatherings even when the virus is spreading out of control, writes Jeffrey Sachs.

Majority rule? We don’t need no stinking majority rule!

Basically, demographic changes are making it impossible for the Republicans to win majorities at the ballot box so they’re doing everything they can to hold back the tide and resist majority rule. But sooner or later, the young’uns won’t put up with it.

A Republican vote to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the next presidential inauguration could deepen the pressure on majority rule that is already threatening to engulf all elements of America's political system.